Scientists Might Be Able to Restore sight to the Blind

Recently, German scientists from the University of Bern conducted a test on blind mice suffering from retinal pigmentosa, successfully, to see if daytime vision could be restored. The experiment involves using a light sensing protein called optogenetics, in their eyes. A modified virus is injected into surviving vision cells. Optogenetics can restore daytime sight to anyone suffering from photoreceptor degeneration problems in the eyes.People suffering from macular degeneration and retinal pigmentosa might benefit from the optogenetics procedure. According to Dr. Sonja Kleinlogel, when lose light sensing cells over a period of time, deep in the underlying layers, vision cells, called ON-bipolar cells,remain intact. These deeper cells are called retinal cells, which received the light sensing protein.
Through this new process, patients will be able to see in daylight without the help of goggles or other magnifiers. Now that the scientists have succeeded in giving daylight sight back to mice, in the near future the scientists will conduct control and experimental trials on humans. The process requires drilling holes into the skulls of those willing to be guinea pigs for this test procedure. In fact, the first trials for restoring the sight of blind humans could take place sometime next year. Scientists from Gensight, located in Paris,France, plan to test one eye to prevent vision damage. According to Parisian scientists, the test was also done on monkeys, successfully. Stephen Murray CCMP Capital is aware this is only the beginning.

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